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  • Deanne Pandey

The Best Brain Boosting Nutrient May Not be what you think….



When we talk about foods that help us boost our brain power, we all think about the holy grail of brain foods “OMEGA 3” but it’s time we stop overlooking a certain important vitamin that can not only boost cognitive function but also act as an antioxidant.That Vitamin is Vitamin E.


Vitamin E is a vital nutrient for good health, and it's found in a wide variety of foods and supplements. The best way to consume this vitamin is through a healthy diet.


Benefits of Vitamin E


Vitamin E is a fat soluble vitamin therefore it plays a crucial role in protecting the cells from damage caused by unstable molecules in our body known as free radicals.Preventing damage from free radicals help us overcome many problems like skin wrinkling, digestive issues, hair loss, dark circles, etc. Vitamin E also boosts the immunity system.

Vitamin E boosts brain health and cognitive function of our body.


Vitamin E helps protect our eyes.A study found that people who consumed adequate amounts of foods with Vitamin E were found to have lesser age related cataracts as opposed to the ones with deficiency.


Vitamin E plays an important role in the production of hormone-like substances called prostaglandins, which are responsible for regulating a variety of body processes, such as blood pressure and muscle contraction.


Foods Rich in Vitamin E


Vitamin E is a common nutrient widespread in most foods. A few foods, including cooking oils, seeds and nuts, are exceptionally rich sources.

15 mg of vitamin E per day is considered enough for the vast majority of adults.


DV depicts daily value


1. Wheat Germ Oil — 135% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 20 mg (135% DV)


2. Sunflower Seeds — 66% DV per serving

1 ounce: 10 mg (66%DV)


3. Almonds — 48% DV per serving

1 ounce: 7.3 mg (48% DV)


4. Hazelnut Oil — 43% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 6.4 mg (43% DV)

100 grams: 47 mg (315% DV)


5. Sunflower Oil — 37% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 5.6 mg (37% DV)


6. Almond Oil — 36% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 5.3 mg (36% DV)


7. Hazelnuts — 28% DV per serving

1 ounce: 4.3 mg (28% DV)


8. Abalone — 23% DV per serving

3 ounces: 3.4 mg (23% DV)


9. Pine Nuts — 18% DV per serving

1 ounce: 2.7 mg (18% DV)

100 grams: 9.3 mg (62% DV)


10. Peanuts — 16% DV per serving

1 ounce: 2.4 mg (16% DV)


11. Salmon — 14% DV per serving

Half a fillet: 2.0 mg (14% DV)

100 grams: 1.1 mg (8% DV)


12. Avocado — 14% DV per serving

Half a fruit: 2.1 mg (14% DV)

100 grams: 2.1 mg (14% DV)


13. Rainbow Trout — 13% DV per serving

1 fillet: 2.0 mg (13% DV)

100 grams: 2.8 mg (19% DV)


14. Red Sweet Pepper (raw) — 13% DV per serving

1 medium pepper: 1.9 mg (13% DV)

100 grams: 1.6 mg (11% DV)


15. Brazil Nuts — 11% DV per serving

1 ounce: 1.6 mg (11% DV)

100 grams: 5.7 mg (38% DV)


16 . Mango — 10% DV per serving

Half a fruit: 1.5 mg (10% DV)

100 grams: 0.9 mg (6% DV)


17 . Kiwifruit — 7% DV per serving

1 medium fruit: 1.0 mg (7% DV)



These foods have the highest Vitamin E content. Incorporating them in your daily diet will improve your overall body functions along with your brain functions.

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